which Countries Were The First To Join The (then) European Community After Its Founding?

What were the first countries to join the EU?

The six founding countries are Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg and the Netherlands.

Which countries were the first to join the EU just after the 6 founding member states?

When the European Economic Community came into being on 1 January 1958, it had just six founding Member States – Belgium, France, Italy, Lux- embourg, the Netherlands and West Germany.

Which European states joined the European Community in the first group?

The first enlargement was in 1973, with the accession of Denmark, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Greece, Spain and Portugal joined in the 1980s. Members.

State Accession
West Germany 25 March 1957
Denmark 1 January 1973
Ireland 1 January 1973
United Kingdom 1 January 1973

Which was the last country to join the EU?

European countries started to cooperate economically since 1951, when only states such as Belgium, France, Luxembourg, Germany, The Netherlands and Italy participated. Gradually, more countries decided to join. The last to join is Croatia – in 2013.

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What are the 6 countries?

  • Austria.
  • Denmark.
  • Norway.
  • Portugal.
  • Sweden.
  • Switzerland.
  • United Kingdom.

Why is Norway not in the EU?

Norway has high GNP per capita, and would have to pay a high membership fee. The country has a limited amount of agriculture, and few underdeveloped areas, which means that Norway would receive little economic support from the EU. The total EEA EFTA commitment amounts to 2.4% of the overall EU programme budget.

Why is Switzerland not in EU?

Switzerland signed a free-trade agreement with the then European Economic Community in 1972, which entered into force in 1973. However, after a Swiss referendum held on 6 December 1992 rejected EEA membership by 50.3% to 49.7%, the Swiss government decided to suspend negotiations for EU membership until further notice.

Why does Europe have so many countries?

Geographical, national, cultural, language, institutional, and religious. Geographical reason is the basic reason, it leads to national difference and language diversity, which caused institutional and religion difference between Europe and China. All those factors make Europe divided into many small countries.

What was the EU called in 1973?

The 1973 enlargement of the European Communities was the first enlargement of the European Communities (EC), now the European Union ( EU ). Denmark, Ireland and the United Kingdom (UK) acceded to the EC on 1 January 1973.

Does the European Economic Community still exist?

The European Economic Community ( EEC ) was a regional organization that aimed to bring about economic integration among its member states. It was created by the Treaty of Rome of 1957. In 2009, the EC formally ceased to exist and its institutions were directly absorbed by the EU.

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What is the difference between the European Community and the European Union?

The European Community ( EC ) was an economic association formed by six European member countries in 1957, consisting of three communities that eventually were replaced by the European Union ( EU ) in 1993. The European Community dealt with policies and governing, in a communal fashion, across all member states.

How many countries are in the European Community?

The European Union ( EU ) is an economic and political union of 27 countries. It operates an internal (or single) market which allows free movement of goods, capital, services and people between member states.

Who makes up the European Community?

The EU’s members are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, and Sweden.

What were the causes for the consolidation and expansion of European Community?

Some of the points agreed were:

  • more powers for the European parliament;
  • introduction of a central banking system, greater economic and monetary union, to culminate in the adoption of a common currency (the euro) shared by all the member states, around the end of the century;
  • a common foreign and security policy;

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